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Category: Coin Show News

PCGS at Boston ANA: On-Site Grading, Award-Winning Proof Copper on Display

At this year’s American Numismatic Association World’s Fair of Money convention in Boston held August 10 – 14, visitors will be treated to a number of museum-quality exhibits of historic rare coins. At booth #105, Professional Coin Grading Service will display an amazing numismatic treasure of early proof copper.

PCGS will provide on-site authentication and grading services at the show including show specials for on-site submissions. And booth visitors can enjoy some of the finest known proof Half Cents, Large Cents, Indian Head Cents and matte proof Lincoln Cents from the award-winning ESM Collection.

Assembled by Illinois collector Pete Miller, the ESM Collection ranks among the all-time finest of its kind in several PCGS Set RegistrySM categories, according to BJ Searls, PCGS Set Registry Manager.

“The ESM Collection is a numismatic treat. Many of the coins in this collection are extremely rare and seldom appear on the market. When they do, they are auction highlights,” said Don Willis, President of PCGS, a division of Collectors Universe, Inc. (NASDA Q: CLCT).

“It staggers me that these coins could stay in that kind of condition for so long,” Miller exclaimed. “They are all red or close to red. Most are well over 100 years old and they look almost brand new, even colorwise.”

Miller’s “top five” personal favorites are:

* 1832 Large Cent, graded PCGS PR64RD
* 1848 Large Cent, PCGS PR65CA
* 1847 Half Cent, PCGS PR64RD
* 1843 Half Cent, PCGS PR64CA
* 1842 Half Cent, PCGS PR65RD

“The weighted Grade Point Average for the ESM Collection is an astounding 65.974,” Searls explained. “These coins were once owned by such astute collectors as Eliasberg, Naftzger, Norweb, Pittman, Parmelee, Atwater, Garrett, Anderson-Dupont, Byron Reed and others. Pete Miller has graciously arranged with PCGS to display many of the coins in his set in Boston.” (more…)

Coin Rarities & Related Topics: Collection of Carson City Half Eagles, WPE Classic Commemoratives & Summer Coin Shows

News and Analysis regarding scarce coins, coin markets, and the coin collecting community #9

A Weekly Column by Greg Reynolds

I. Summer Topics

Today’s main discussions are about Carson City Half Eagles and commemorative silver coins. I admit that I am not a specialist in either area. I will not, however, limit my writings to my favorite topics, as other coins ‘make news’ and are important in a variety of ways. I aim to write for a wide audience. Plus, I have a fondness for most all rare coins and I learn when I prepare to write. I enjoy researching rare coins of almost every kind.

Typically, the coin business is relatively slow between the Spring Long Beach Expo and the Summer ANA Convention. Collectors and dealers often vacation, or are just less active, during this period.

The relatively new, Summer FUN Convention is moderately successful, though it makes far more sense to hold it in West Palm Beach or Fort Lauderdale. It was in West Palm Beach for three years and I attended all three events, which seemed successful. The Summer FUN Convention was developing a following in Southern Florida. Was it a good idea to move it to Orlando?

Many wealthy coin collectors live in Southern Florida, which is much more densely populated in general than Central Florida. As people are not eager to travel to Florida in the middle of the summer, a Southern Florida location, for a coin show, makes more sense in the summer than does Orlando, which is a city that has evolved into a destination for travelers. Besides, people elsewhere are more likely to have relatives, friends or business ties in Southern Florida than in Orlando. Consider the populations, wealth and business activities in the metropolitan areas of Fort Lauderdale and Miami!

Boston seems to be a good choice for a Summer ANA Convention. Many (though not all) rare coin sales are exempt from sales tax in Massachusetts. There are thousands of serious coin collectors within driving distance of Boston and hundreds more who may fly to Boston. Certainly, it is a city with attractions for girlfriends, spouses or kids. Besides, in relation to the founding of the United States, and the pre-revolutionary period, Boston is of tremendous historical importance.

It has been a very long time since an ANA Convention has been held in New England. Further, there are no longer any regularly held, first tier coin conventions in Massachusetts or the State of New York. CoinFest is held, annually each autumn, in Stamford (CT). In my view, CoinFest has been very successful and may eventually become a first tier event. It would be better if the fourth CoinFest, in October, were not scheduled within a week of the Fall Baltimore Expo. Could its time frame be moved a week or two earlier?

In August, both pre-convention shows will attract collectors. While the “Boston 2010” show at the Park Plaza Hotel has received some recent attention, the Bay State Coin Show has been a tradition in Boston for decades. The special summer Bay State Coin Show will be at the Radisson Hotel, at Park Square, from Friday, Aug 6th to Sunday, Aug 8th.
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Video News: Memphis International Paper Money Show Market Report and Commentary

By David Lisot  – CoinTelevision

The 34th Memphis International Paper Money Show Convention is now under new management. Currency dealer and paper money enthusiast Lyn Knight purchased the show and has instituted some changes to keep this annual gathering as the premier paper money show.

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See and learn what Lyn plans to do running the show as well as hear from some of the attendees what they think about the show, the market and the town of Memphis.

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Lyn Knight, Doug Davis, Tom Conklin, Michael Findlay, Pierre Fricke, Lowell Horwedel, Harry Jones, Donald Kelly, Debbie Knight, Morland Fischer, Mike Moczalla, Gilman Parsons, Vern Potter, Jeremy Steinberg, Peter Treglia, and Crutch Williams provide commentary.

Classic Coin to Display Two Ultra Rare Double Eagles in Boston Valued at $18 Million

“Coins Worthy of a King” the 1861-P Paquet and 1921 Proof Double Eagles in Historic ANA Exhibit

An $18 million display of two rare Double Eagles accompanied by Boston-related early Americana will be one of the exhibit highlights in the Museum Showcase area at the American Numismatic Association World’s Fair of Money convention in Boston, August 10 – 14, 2010.

1861-P Paquet $20 NGC MS67:  Formerly in the famous Farouk and Norweb collections, this 1861 Philadelphia Mint "Paquet Reverse" gold $20, graded NGC MS67, will be displayed at the ANA World's Fair of Money in Boston courtesy of Brian Hendelson of Classic Coin Co.  (Photo courtesy of Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.)The coins in this first-ever display are the finer each of the two known 1861 Philadelphia Mint “Paquet Reverse” gold $20, graded NGC MS67, and 1921 Proof Roman Finish Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, graded NGC SP64.

[PHOTO CAPTION: 1861-P Paquet $20 NGC MS67 – Formerly in the famous Farouk and Norweb collections, this 1861 Philadelphia Mint “Paquet Reverse” gold $20, graded NGC MS67, will be displayed at the ANA World’s Fair of Money in Boston courtesy of Brian Hendelson of Classic Coin Co. (Photo courtesy of Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.)]

Insured for $8 million each, they are being provided for the ANA exhibit by Brian Hendelson, President of Classic Coin Co. of Bridgewater, New Jersey.

“This will be the first time both coins have ever been displayed at the same time and location. It will be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for thousands of visitors to see them together up close,” he said.

In addition to these two coins, other historic items in the display from Hendelson’s own collection include one of the few known surviving broadsides of the Declaration of Independence printed in Boston circa July 17, 1776 by printers Gill, Powars and Willis; seven silver spoons crafted by legendary Boston patriot Paul Revere; and a silver teapot and knee buckles made by fellow Colonial era Boston silversmith, Jacob Hurd, that were acquired by a New England family in 1785 and passed down to their heirs for over two centuries.

In descriptive text prepared for the exhibit, ANA Museum Curator Douglas Mudd headlines the Paquet design Double Eagle as “a coin fit for a king.” One of its former owners was the notorious King Farouk of Egypt who amassed a fabled coin collection before he was deposed in 1952. It also was in the famous coin collection of Ambassador and Mrs. R. Henry Norweb.

Nearly three million Double Eagles were struck in 1861 at the Philadelphia Mint, but today only two are known with a slightly modified design on the reverse made by Assistant Mint Engraver, Anthony Paquet, who also engraved the first Congressional Medal of Merit. His lettering on the $20 coin is taller and more slender than the design originally created in 1857 by Chief Engraver James Longacre. (more…)

Legendary $20 Gold 1882 Double Eagle Coin To Be Offered by Heritage at Summer Fun Auction

The 1882 double eagle is so rare that even the Smithsonian Institution, keeper of the National Numismatic Collection, lacks an example of this issue.

While there are numerous double eagle issues from the late 1870s through early 1890s that boast extraordinarily low mintages, the 1882 is the absolute lowest-mintage of them all, at 571 coins. Any representative of this issue, in any grade, is an extraordinary rarity.

The next-lowest mintage of the denomination in the 1880s is the 1885, produced to the extent of 751 coins–an increase of over 30% in comparison to the 1882. In fact, the 1882 double eagle has the lowest mintage of any circulation strike in the double eagle series, save for the 1861-P Paquet Reverse.

The 1882 double eagle is not only an issue with a remarkably low mintage to begin with, but its rarity is compounded because so few were saved. The handful of contemporary collectors who specialized in gold–and they were few and far between–preferred proof examples, which could be had from the Mint for a modest premium.

The reasons for the minuscule mintage are complicated. Mint officials had adopted a new policy to stimulate national demand for half eagles and eagles, according to Rusty Goe in The Mint on Carson Street.

“… double eagle output was decreased on a national scale as the Treasury implemented its new policy of expanding the distribution of $5 and $10 gold pieces. It was the Treasury’s conviction that if more gold coins in denominations less than twenty dollars were in reserve at Mint offices around the country, depositors would accept these coins in payment in lieu of waiting for additional double eagles to be struck.”

At any rate, the nation’s operating mints had other troubles, as they shouldered the enormous burden of Morgan silver dollar production in 1882, amounting to more than 27.5 million pieces at four facilities.

By contrast, only three mints struck double eagles at all, as New Orleans’ last twenty was the 1879-O. In 1882 San Francisco struck 1.13 million twenties, with nearly 40,000 in Carson City–and the legendary low mintage of 571 double eagles in Philadelphia.


This coin will be offered at  Heritage’s Official Summer Fun Sale in Orlando, Fl as Lot # 1464

Population: 2 in 53, 7 finer (6/10)

SS Central America Shipwreck “Ship of Gold” Exhibit Comes to ANA World’s Fair of Money in Boston

Exhibit Includes Treasures from 1857 SS Central America Shipwreck

The incredible “Ship of Gold” exhibit, showcasing California Gold Rush-era sunken treasure recovered from the 1857 shipwreck of the SS Central America, will make port in Boston at the American Numismatic Association’s World’s Fair of Money, August 10-14 at the Hynes Convention Center. The exhibit is courtesy of Monaco Rare Coins of Newport Beach, Calif.

The SS Central America was recovered in 1988 from nearly 8,000 feet below the surface of the Atlantic Ocean. The ship sank in a hurricane in September 1857 while carrying California gold from Panama to New York City.

“There will be examples of historic assayers’ ingots as well as San Francisco Mint and California territorial gold coins with a combined value of over $10 million,” said Adam Crum, vice president of Monaco. “One of the highlights is a huge Kellogg & Humbert ingot. Weighing just over 55 troy pounds, it is the largest surviving gold ingot of the California Gold Rush.”

The exhibit also includes one of the 13 recovered octagonal $50 gold pieces produced by the United States Assay Office of San Francisco, and the remains of a wooden cargo box that still contains approximately 110 Double Eagles as they were found on the ocean floor. Many appear to be 1857-S $20 gold pieces, apparently freshly struck at the San Francisco Mint when they were placed in the container for shipping.

Visitors will see the front pages of three 1857 newspapers that published stories about the shipwreck, the ordeal of survivors and the devastating economic effects created by the loss of the gold. Robert Evans, the chief scientist on the 1980s mission by the Columbus-America Discovery Group that located and recovered the magnificent sunken treasure, will be in Boston to meet visitors and discuss the SS Central America, her cargo, crew and passengers.

The Ship of Gold display was first publicly presented in February 2000. Over the years it has been seen by more than one million people in exhibitions at several venues and cities across the country.

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[Adam Crum of Monaco Rare Coins Gives a  Tour of the Exhibit – Originally Filmed on Long Beach
Video Courtesy of CoinTelevision.com]

The ANA World’s Fair of Money is the nation’s premiere money show. Show hours are 1-5:30 p.m. August 10, and 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. August 11-14. Dealer set-up is from 8 a.m.-
1 p.m. Tuesday, August 10. Admission is $6 for adults, and free for ANA members and children 12 and under. For more information on all of the show highlights, call 719-482-9857 or visit www.worldsfairofmoney.com.

Simpson Collection of Bickford $10 Pattern Coins to be displayed at Boston ANA

A complete set of 1874 Bickford $10 Pattern coins will be exhibited at the American Numismatic Associations Boston Money Show August 11-14th. 

The set is part of perhaps the most complete collection of US pattern coins ever assembled and include all seven of the  variations attributed according to Judd numbers (US Pattern Coins, Experimental & Trial Pieces by J. Hewitt Judd, Edited by Q. David Bowers), include Judd-1373, one of just two known examples struck in gold.

Texan Bob Simpson is the ultimate numismatic connoisseur, desiring only those coins that meet his exacting standards. He knows what he wants, and nothing less will do. Facilitating his efforts is his longtime numismatic consultant, Laura Sperber of Legend Numismatics. The old saying, “Know your coins or know your dealer” is particularly apt, as Mr. Simpson knows both, and this relationship has paid off with an epic collection of coins that compares favorably with the great named collections of the past.

Mr. Simpson’s premier passion is United States pattern and trial coins, and his collection of these is unparalleled. Comprising most of the entries found in Dr. J. Hewitt Judd’s standard reference work, United States Pattern Coins, now in its 10th edition, the Simpson Collection is the greatest assemblage of such coins since Judd’s own collection was dispersed some 50 years ago.

The coins in the collection include the following:

The Bickford pattern ten dollar gold pieces, Judd-1373, were not known to numismatists of the 19th century. The design was struck in copper, aluminum, and nickel compositions, as well as gold, with both plain and reeded edges. Examples of the design in copper appeared in various auction catalogs of the period, but even the greatest pattern collections of the era did not include an example of Judd-1373. Robert Coulton Davis published the first important work on U.S. pattern coins in the Coin Collector’s Journal in 1885, where he described both plain and reeded edge varieties of the design in copper, but he was unaware of the strikings in other metals. (more…)

Video: Interview with Larry Shepherd, ANA Executive Director on “Why Chicago” For Future Summer ANA Conventions

The American Numismatic Association Board of Governors, on March 27, approved a recommendation from Executive Director Larry Shepherd to name Chicago as the site of the summer ANA World’s Fair of Money® in 2013, 2014 and 2015, and to launch a fall show in 2011.

Shepherd stressed the importance of branding Chicago as the home of the summer ANA World’s Fair of Money, noting the success FUN has had branding Orlando as its home, and Whitman establishing Baltimore as a show destination.

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“By selecting a single good location, the ANA will brand its summer convention as an annual ‘coin show destination’ that all collectors and dealers will strive to attend. The dates will be tightly fixed, the location well known and easily accessible at a reasonable cost. But most importantly, it will give us an opportunity to expand our show and set it apart from all others.”

Shepherd said the convention hall space available at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center (formerly the Rosemont Convention Center) in Chicago allows the ANA to increase bourse space, create more room for museum-quality exhibits, provide free space for clubs and professional organizations to meet, and provide more table options to attract new dealers and first-time buyer tables.

By encouraging specialty numismatic organizations to gather for the World’s Fair of Money, those organizations could make the summer ANA the destination for all of their annual meetings, symposiums and educational programs. Specialty numismatic organizations would be encouraged to offer educational content to all ANA members, with the ANA coordinating its presentations with those of specialty organizations, thus making it possible to further expand educational offerings. In addition, the time slot between the “Official Pre-Show” and the World’s Fair of Money could be used to add educational classes and tie-ins to Summer Seminar.
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Coin Rarities & Related Topics: 1794 Silver Dollar, 1795 Reeded Edge Large Cent, and selected coins in the Summer FUN Auction

News and Analysis regarding scarce coins, coin markets, and the coin collecting community #6

A Weekly Column by Greg Reynolds

Herein, I discuss an assortment of rarities ‘in the news,’ the NGC graded “MS-64” 1794 dollar, a newly re-emergent 1795 Reeded Edge Cent, an 1882 $20 gold coin, 1865 $2½ coins, and 1865 quarters. The 1795 Reeded Edge Cent is certainly much rarer than most collectors realize and many have forgotten that the finest known Holmes-Naftzger 1795 Reeded Edge set an auction record for a copper coin or pattern, and is the only copper to sell for more than $1 million at auction. Another representative of this issue was just encapsulated by the NGC.

Today’s primary item is the ‘news’ that the Boyd-Cardinal 1794 dollar has been consigned to the B&M pre-ANA Boston auction. Additionally, I will discuss a few coins that will be sold as part of an upcoming Heritage auction, which will be held in conjunction with the Summer FUN Convention in Orlando, July 8th to 10th. Though it would make far more sense to hold it in Fort Lauderdale or in West Palm Beach, where it has been since its inception in 2007, I expect the Summer FUN Convention to be a success.

My comments about a handful of coins are not meant to constitute an analysis of this sizeable Heritage auction, which includes desirable U.S. coins of almost all types. The offerings are particularly strong in so-called small denomination coins, Indian Cents, Lincoln Cents, Two Cent pieces, Three Cent Silvers, Three Cent Nickels, and Five Cent Nickels. Further, this auction contains a large number of early 20th century gold commemoratives. Additionally, there are numerous better-date gold coins of several denominations. Also, the Kallenberg collection of Proof Washington Quarters is the first “All-time Finest” in the PCGS registry in the category of a “Basic Set” that covers Proofs from 1936 to the present.

II. Boyd-Cardinal 1794 Silver Dollar

I have been informed by Martin Logies that the Cardinal Collection Educational Foundation has consigned the Boyd-Cardinal 1794 dollar to the B&M August auction. This coin is graded “MS-64” by the NGC. When it was last auctioned, on June 30, 2005, it was so graded. This coin is widely regarded as the fourth or fifth finest 1794 silver dollar.

Logies is the director of the Cardinal Collection Educational Foundation. Recently, in May, he was prominent ‘in the news’ when this foundation acquired the finest known 1794 dollar from Steve Contursi for a reported price of “$7,850,000”! The Carter-Contursi-Cardinal 1794 is certified as Specimen-66 by the PCGS. It was specially prepared. (more…)

Legend Market Report – The June Baltimore Coin Show

By Laura Sperber – Legend Numismatics

The show turned out exactly how we thought it would be-decent but quiet. Most dealers we spoke to (on our level) did very little. Several left Friday. Yet we know of a few smaller dealers who had nice coins and did VERY well. Collectors did attend, but the usual gang did not show up in any group larger than one or two. Most attendees did not seem to be serious buyers. They came to kick some tires and chat. One dealer friend commented he’d have done better if he rented his coins out to the lookie loos each time they sat down. As usual, the Whitman staff put on a class act show.

WHY THE JUNE BALTIMORE SHOW IS A BAD BAROMETER FOR THE MARKET

The June Baltimore Show is the equivalent of the stock market making a major gain/loss on a lightly traded short day. We do have a serious comment/opinion: While we love the show, absolutely ranking ALL Whitman Baltimore shows as the BEST run, and love having them in Baltimore, having it two times a year might be better than three. The summer show is typically 1/3 the size smaller. Traffic is significantly lighter. For some reason, its always harder to get in and out of town in June (this year we were lucky the O’s were not home).

At this show, very few of the West Coast dealers attended due to close scheduling of the Long Beach Show. For the markets sake, we think a few shows have to give. The reason why we think one Baltimore has go is because of their own Philadelphia Fall show (which they need to move as well since it yet again follows on the heels of Long Beach). Hard for us to believe Whitman does not realize it is the same market. It stretches everyone thin by overloading shows-and this is NOT the time of year to do so. That definitely contributes to why the show was quiet.

We still can sell ALL the great coins we can get our hands on. We know other dealers in the same position. Just having show after show does not help the market if everyone is spent, tired, and needs time to refresh their inventories especially when the public wants to be outdoors.

WHEN DRECK RULES

WOW dreck can slow a show! We saw just about EVERY major dealer at one time or another actually walk the floor seeking coins. They ALL came back pretty much empty handed and shaking their heads. There were few fresh and nice coins in anyones display case. If you had the nice fresh material, it was sold instantly. So there really was nothing but either tired or dreck coins in a lot of cases. That equated to either huge losses or no sales. A few major dealers are now in weak cash flows and have too much dead inventory. But then we all kind of expected this between now and ANA (which means activity and rising prices will slow). Watch the ALL the ANA auctions for a serious amount of retreads.
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2010 ANA Medal Features Paul Revere

The official medal for the American Numismatic Association’s 119th Anniversary Convention, August 10-14 in Boston, is available for purchase. Designed by Jamie Franki, former master designer in the United States Mint’s Artistic Infusion Program, the medal celebrates one of Boston’s most famous citizens, Paul Revere.

The obverse depicts the engraver and patriot’s storied “Midnight Ride,” while the reverse calls to mind designs he engraved for a 2-shilling issue of colonial currency.

Franki began the design process by consulting Patrick M. Leehey, research director of the Paul Revere House and Museum in Boston.

“He suggested excellent reading material and also gave me a good idea of what Revere wore on his ride,” said Franki. “I employed the assistance of a seamstress who specializes in historic garments. She created a period-authentic outfit based on the direction I received from the Revere House. A friend let me borrow a horse for a photo shoot. I spent an afternoon at her farm in Concord (N.C.) dressed in colonial garb and riding the horse.”

From the photos, Franki created composites, sketching in Revere’s face based on portraits by various artists. He completed the design with a replica of Revere’s signature, taken from his handwritten account of the ride to Concord.

The artist relied on Clarence S. Brigham’s reference Paul Revere’s Engravings for the reverse design, examining reproductions of the colonial currency engraved by Revere to adapt his “rising sun” and “pine tree” devices from a 2-shilling note. This design anchors the legend for the ANA 119th annual convention. Two sets of initials attribute the design of the medal to Paul Revere and Franki. A border of 119 beads and a rim completes the composition.

Jamie Franki is a tenured associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in the Department of Art and Art History. He received his MFA from Syracuse University. In 2005, his American Bison Nickel reverse design was selected for a six-month minting. This nickel was awarded a Coin of the Year Award in 2005. In 2006, his Jefferson 1800 nickel obverse design was featured on America’s historic forward-facing circulating coin. He has also designed medals for the 2007 ANA National Money Show in Charlotte and 2008 World’s Fair of Money in Baltimore.

“I hope my efforts were worthy of such a weighty task,” Franki said. “It was truly a pleasure to research a great American hero and to celebrate his patriotism and artistry.” (more…)

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Unique NJ Banknotes Stolen 2 Years Ago Returned to Owner at Long Beach Coin Expo

A unique six-note uncut sheet of $5 New Jersey National Currency notes stolen two years ago was returned to its grateful owner at the Long Beach Coin, Stamp & Collectibles Expo during dealer set up on June 2, 2010. The sheet was taken in an October 2008 burglary from the offices of dealer Kevin Lipton of Beverly Hills, California, and is the only item recovered so far.

Beverly Hills, California dealer Kevin Lipton happily holds the recovered six-note $5 National Currency sheet from the Branchville, NJ Bank stolen from his office in 2008.  It was recently recovered by Virgel Nickell and brought to him at the June 2010 Long Beach Coin, Stamp & Collectibles Expo.  (Photo credit: Donn Pearlman.)

“It’s the only thing stolen from my office that I ever cared anything about,” said Lipton who gratefully gave a $5,000 reward to the part-time dealer who recovered and returned the sheet.

“The notes are from Branchville, New Jersey, and that’s the town where I went to summer camp as a child. I bought the sheet at a Christie’s auction in 1982, and they were framed and displayed in my office for years. The notes are reminiscent of my youth,” explained Lipton.

The sheet is the only known six-note uncut sheet of Series 1929 Type II National Currency $5 notes from The Branchville Bank in Branchville, New Jersey. The notes are consecutively numbered, A000001 through A000006.

It was recovered unframed by Virgel Nickell of Santa Ana, California who describes himself as “a dabbler” in National bank notes. Nickell was at a swap meet in Huntington Beach, California in early May when he was approached by a young man who wanted to sell the notes.

“He wanted $500 for it. I figured it was a common sheet, but my reaction was that it was good buy at $500. But when a friend and I researched it on the Internet we learned it was not only rare, it was not mine,” said Nickell.

“I knew I couldn’t keep it. I had to return this to its owner, so I brought the sheet to Long Beach because I thought Kevin would be there. I wasn’t expecting anything in return. I cried when he gave me money for it. I wasn’t expecting that.”

“I couldn’t believe it when he showed me the notes. They’re the only thing taken that I cared about,” Lipton reiterated.

Long Beach Expo General Chairman Ronald J. Gillio was at Lipton’s table as the notes were being returned.
“Kevin was ecstatic. He was so excited, his face was just beaming,” Gillio said.

Anyone with information regarding the theft or the still missing coins and paper money is urged to contact the Detective Division of the Beverly Hills Police Department at (310) 285-2158.

Rare Coin Market Report: The June 2010 Long Beach Show

By Laura Sperber – Legend Numismatics

Long Beach can be a mystery show. You may think you will do well and you won’t, or you may think you’ll do poor and do great. This show we did what we set out to accomplish-we bought some deals. However, had we not had these deals prescheduled, it would have been a complete bust. Even the now lone auction before the show (Goldberg) had very little Legend quality coins in it. For the first time in 10+ years, we stayed home and enjoyed the Memorial Day weekend.

Prior to”set up” day, we do whats called “lobby leaching”. That’s where we hang out at the hotels and do business (some scheduled, some not). We sensed right away this was not going to be an easy show. Many of the usual suspects had delayed their trips as well and few dealers were around to do business. We bought two coins totaling $4,000.00 Tuesday, a record low. So we gave up after two hours and went to dinner with a customer. Later we were told we missed nothing.

Typically the crowd to get in set up is large and anxious. This time, it was thin and quiet-something very unusual. Two things clearly had a major impact on dealers attendance: East Coast dealers pretty much stayed away because the Baltimore show is less than a week away. Second, it was sadly evident that a number of major dealers gave up their tables. There was no “buzz” on set up day. It was also the first time Legend made NO purchases what so ever on dealer day. There were NO Legend calibre coins to be found on the floor.

WHEN THE DOORS OPENED THURSDAY

Thursday was a complete surprise: a huge crowd showed up! There definitely was activity, however it was hard to tell if many rare coins were bought (we know generics and bullion were in demand). Also, the reduced amount of table may have given an illusion the show was busier than it was.

We had come to the show expecting to buy three deals and did. Deal #1: the Famous Bear Collection. This coin contains some fabulous handpicked mid range type coins. Deal #2: a partial GEM Type set all coins CAC. The coins are both rare and amazing! All are CAC. Deal #3: what we really traveled for, a stunning group of Early Copper coins. Between these three deals, we spent in excess of $1,250,000.00-something we had not done in over 2 years at Long Beach. We did not hear many complaints on Thursday except for the ever severe lack of coins.

THE MARKET

Checkout the results of the Heritage Auction and you will immediately see how strong the market is. They did not have any blockbuster collections and prices still managed to reach spectacular levels. The prices realized more than proved how strong demand is. There was a small group of GEM MS/DMPL Morgans all Ex PCGS Tour that brought crazy money. These coins had been off the market for many years. A collection of old holdered PR Seated and Barber Dimes brought insane prices (example $8,000.00 for a 1899 PCGS PR66 10C). Better gold coins also sold for very strong money as did pretty much anything nice and fresh. Someone at Heritage had told us that before the auction began, they had an 80% sell through. (more…)

Over 3400 Lots at Heritage’s Memphis International Paper Money Show Currency Auction

[ CoinLink News ] The Official Currency Auction of the 2010 Memphis International Paper Money Show in Memphis will be conducted by Heritage Auctions June 17-21. The auction will include three floor sessions and an online session. Lot viewing will be conducted at the Cook Convention Center, East Hall, 225 N. Main Street in Memphis, and the floor sessions will be held at the Memphis Marriott Downtown, Heritage Ballroom, 250 North Main Street.

Session One will begin on Thursday evening, June 17, at 6 p.m. CST, and includes World Currency, Canadian Currency, Miscellaneous, Continental Currency, Colonials, Fractional Currency, Obsoletes, Confederate Notes, and Military Payment Certificates.

Heritage Currency Auctions is pleased to present a large selection of World notes as part of Session One. Eighty one countries will be represented by the 226 lots being offered. Featured lots include: Australia Commonwealth of Australia £10 ND (1927) Pick 18b R55 PMG Choice About Unc 58, Hawaii Republic of Hawaii Silver Certificate of Deposit $10 1895 (1897) Pick 12a PCGS Fine 12, and a Palestine £10 Palestine Currency Board 1929 Pick 9b PMG Choice Very Fine 35. The Canadian offerings include a BC-19 $1000 1935 PMG Gem Uncirculated 65 EPQ and a Halifax, NS- The Bank of Nova Scotia $100 1929 Ch # 550-28-40 PMG Very Fine 20.

Additional Session One highlights include: an extremely rare “Independence” Sword in Hand Note

Massachusetts November 17, 1776 36s PMG Choice Very Fine 35; a Maryland July 26, 1775 $1 1/3 PMG Choice Fine 15 Allegorical Note; fourteen group lots of Obsoletes from the Bank of the State of South Carolina, among them Charleston, SC- Bank of the State of South Carolina Fractional Notes, Including Several Unlisted Varieties; a Confederate T6 $50 1861 PMG Choice Uncirculated 64 EPQ; a rare Ball 277 Cr. 137 $5000 1863 Four Per Cent Call Certificate PMG Very Fine 20; and Military Payment Certificate Series 661 $10 PMG Gem Uncirculated 65 EPQ.

Small Size Notes, Error Notes, and Large Size Notes will be featured during Session Two beginning on Friday, June 18 at 6 p.m. CST. Among the Small Size selections are newly discovered $5,000 and $10,000 Federal Reserve Notes from the Dallas district Fr. 2221-K $5000 1934 LGS FRN Note PMG Very Fine 30 and Fr. 2231-K $10000 1934 FRN PCGS Apparent Very Fine 25, and a gorgeous Fr. 2407 $500 1928 Gold Certificate PMG Gem Uncirculated 65 EPQ. A number of outstanding Error Notes will be presented, including the “King of Errors,” a Fr. 964/Fr. 904 $20/$10 1914 Double Denomination FRN PCGS About New 50, and a Skaneateles, NY – $10 1929 Ty. 1 The NB of Skaneateles Ch. # 5360 with a rare inverted overprint of the black ink portion. Large Size offerings include a Fr. 1072a $100 1914 Red Seal FRN PMG Gem Uncirculated 66 EPQ that is tied for finest known and the  Ten Note Federal Reserve Proof Presentation Set Number 1 that was presented by Secretary of the Treasury William G. McAdoo on December 21, 1914. (more…)

Nashville Show Report

By William Shamhart, Jr. – Numismatic Americana

The inauguration is over, now it is time to get down to work and attend to the things that need fixing. No, I am not talking about the political state of our country (and I never will), I am talking about the first annual Nashville show produced by the good folks at Whitman Coin and Expo.

We’ve all seen and heard of the devastating floods that ravaged the area a few weeks ago, nashville2010imgand while I didn’t see any standing water, the aftermath was evident everywhere. Coming in from the airport I could see where the river had crested fifty feet (50 feet!) above its banks. That’s pretty impressive, even for a Missouri boy who is use to floods of Biblical proportions. Disaster clean-up crews were working in the downtown area around the clock. Apparently a lot of the older building there with basements had serious water damage. Even with this disaster, everyone we spoke with was in good spirits. Tennesseans are a hearty lot; they rolled up their sleeves and got to work. No complaining, no blaming. I was impressed. Whitman expressed concern for the unfortunate timing, but realized (as I did) that there was nothing they could do. The show must go on. And it did.

The show itself was held in the adjoining convention center to the Renaissance Hotel where we stayed. This is good. I’ve always liked a show where you don’t have to walk outside to get from the hotel to the bourse floor. It just makes sense from a security point of view, as well as not having to haul your inventory around outside and possibly getting caught out in the elements (like the heavy rain present on Thursday). The show/hotel was held just one block off the “main” street in downtown Nashville, so dealers and attendees alike could enjoy the nightlife “Music City” is known for. This is a big “plus” as many dealers and collectors like to see the sights of the towns they attend. The nickname “Music City” says it all.

Set up for the show was at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday. In my opinion this might have been a little early. This meant that most “National” dealers had to come to town on Tuesday evening and incur the added expense of an extra night’s hotel room. We also noticed that many of the local and regional dealers didn’t make it to the show until later that day, or even Thursday. Perhaps a set-up time in the afternoon would be better. Something for Whitman to think about.

We had bought a few deals in the past weeks that we brought to the show to wholesale out. This we did with little effort. While these coins weren’t exactly the kind we like to offer our clients, it seems that demand for coins of all levels is somewhat strong right now. And while this is good news, we didn’t need to travel to Nashville to find that out. Retail collectors are why we came here. There hadn’t been a “National” or even a regional coin show here in 35 years so we were interested to see what kind of collector base this area had. On Thursday and Friday we found out. There are serious collectors here, as we met some of them. But I can’t help but wonder if the above mentioned flood didn’t keep some away (cleaning up their homes, as well as helping their neighbors). (more…)

Bowers and Merena Baltimore Coin Auction to Include Over 3500 Lots

Bowers and Merena will conduct the Official auction of the June 2010 Whitman Coin & Collectibles Baltimore Expo. Scheduled for June 16-20, 2010 at the Baltimore Convention Center, the sale will present nearly 3,500 lots of United States coins, exonumia and related items.

According to Bowers and Merena president Steve Deeds: “We have a wonderful sale planned for the June 2010 Baltimore Expo anchored by several important collections and Registry Sets.

In the category of Registry Sets we are featuring the Close to Perfect Collection, #1 All-Time Finest Lincoln Memorial Cents Basic Set on the PCGS Registry and the Weston Collection, PCGS Registry Set #8 in the category Capped Bust Half Dollars Major Variety Set without Reeded Edges.

The Close to Perfect Collection includes many low-pop condition rarities, including some stellar-quality MS-69s and MS-70s from the 21st century, while the Weston Collection features many original collector coins in VF, EF and AU.”

“Among U.S. gold coin offerings,” continued Deeds, “bidders will find the Windermere Collection and its fantastic array of rare-date Liberty Double Eagles and Territorial gold. Leading the way are 1855-O $20 NGC AU-55, 1859-O $20 NGC AU-55, 1860-O $20 NGC AU-58, 1861-O $20 NGC AU-55, 1861-S Paquet $20 NGC AU-50 and an 1852 Augustus Humbert $50 Gold, Reeded Edge, 880 THOUS, PCGS AU-55.

The Fab Five Collection of Early Half Eagles will also entice gold enthusiasts with a selection of five early Half Eagles, a fresh consignment recently certified by our company for the first time and making its first appearance in a major numismatic auction. A historic 1795 Small Eagle Five in NGC MS-61 leads off the Fab Five Collection, and it is an example of the scarcer BD-8 die marriage.”

Concluded Deeds: “Numerous other important rarities can also be found scattered throughout our June 2010 Baltimore Auction. We have a beautiful and rare 1930-S Double Eagle in PCGS Secure MS-65+, a top-of-the-pop 1917 Doubled Die Obverse Lincoln Cent, FS-101, PCGS Secure MS-67 RD from The Holdings of Ron Groszmann, a well-known 1794 Flowing Hair Silver Dollar rarity in a PCGS Genuine holder and countless other highlights from Colonial coinage through Territorials. Plus, a complete set of Proof Barber dimes, as well as nearly complete sets of Indian cents, Mercury dimes, Standing Liberty quarters, and a type set with key coinage, all collected in the 1950s and 1960s. No matter what your area of specialization, I am confident that the Bowers and Merena June 2010 Baltimore Auction holds many important bidding opportunities. Enjoy the sale, and good luck with your bids.”

Additional highlights in the Bowers and Merena June 2010 Baltimore Auction include:

  • 1926-S Buffalo Nickel, NGC MS-65
  • 1937-D Buffalo Nickel, 3-Legged, PCGS MS-65, CAC
  • 1797 Draped Bust Half Dime, 16 Stars, NGC MS-64, CAC
  • 1800 Draped Bust Half Dime, PCGS MS-64
  • 1807 Draped Bust Dime, NGC MS-65, OH
  • 1795 Flowing Hair Silver Dollar, Three Leaves, PCGS MS-62
  • 1795 Capped Bust Right Eagle, 13 Leaves, NGC AU-55
  • 1872 Liberty Eagle, PCGS Proof-64 DCAM, Ex: J.F. Bell Collection
  • MCMVII (1907) High Relief Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle, Wire Rim, NGC MS-66
  • A Complete 1871 Standard Silver Pattern Proof Set, Half Dime through Dollar, Ex: Garrett
  • 1872 Pattern Commercial Dollar, Judd-1217, PCGS Proof-64 RB
  • 1849 Mormon $2.50 Gold, K-1, PCGS VF-35, CAC—Gold Label, OGH—First Generation
  • 1849 Oregon Exchange Company $5 Gold, K-1, NGC AU Details—Tooled
  • 1883 Hawaii Eighth Dollar, PCGS Secure Proof-63 Cameo (more…)

World Coin Highlights from Goldbergs Upcoming Pre Long Beach sale

Ira and Larry Goldberg will be holding three exceptional sales prior Long Beach. They include the sale of THE DAN HOLMES COLLECTION Part II, Middle Date U.S. Large Cents on Sunday May 30th, 2010, United States Coins and Currency on Monday May 31st, 2010 and then Ancient and World Coins & Currency on Tuesday & Wednesday June 1& 2, 2010.

Here we would like to highlight 4 of the World Coin Highlights, coincidentally all from the previous Goldberg’s Millennia Sale. They are as follows:

Lot 3411 Russia. Peter I, 1682-1725. Novodel Ruble struck in Gold, 1705 (Moscow).

Fr-76 (62); Sev-12; Bitkin-532; Diakov-page 87, part 1. 44.22 grams. Laureate, cuirassed youthful bust right. Reverse: Crowned, double-headed eagle with scepter and orb. Plain edge. Sharply struck with all details bold, Peter’s hair curls in higher than normal relief. The surfaces are fully prooflike on both sides, with the devices softly lustrous to frosty matte and the fields reflective with an almost watery texture. Undoubtedly a high gift of state, the coin has been carefully preserved, with minimal marks or hairlines. The reverse die shows faint radiating cracks. This is one of the most important of all Russian coins!

Struck in gold to the weight of 13 Ducats, 44.22 grams, and created from the dies of the novodel ruble of 1705 (Sev-185), this is the plate coin shown in Bitkin and Diakov which appeared in both the 1977 Soderman and the 1991 Goodman auctions and is the only specimen appearing at public auction in over 25 years. Severin mentions this particular specimen (his number 12) as well as another weighing 40.4 grams, making this one of only two known examples. He also mentions a gold 1707 rouble (no. 18) and a 1723 in 12-ducat weight, each presumably unique. NGC graded MS-63.

Among Peter’s numerous reforms, he caused his country’s coinage system to change from being the most old-fashioned in Europe to being the most up to date. His was the first coinage to employ the decimal system (dividing the Ruble into one hundred smaller units, of copper Kopecks). Part of his reform involved devaluation, which made, for the first time, the Russian Ruble equivalent in its buying power to the Polish, Saxony and Silesian thalers which had seen such free circulation within the country before. It is said that, when the first Ruble coins bearing Western-style Arabic dates were struck in 1707, it was Peter himself operating the coin press!
Estimated Value $275,000 – 325,000.

Ex Dr. Robert D. Hesselgesser Collection (5/30 – 6/1/05), lot 1751; Goodman Collection (Superior, Feb. 1991), lot 4; and Soderman Collection (Swiss Bank, Feb. 1977); Illustrated in Money of The World, coin 115. Ex Millennia, Lot 802 where it Realized $340,000 (more…)

Exceptional Early Copper Coin Collection Exhibit To Highlight Long Beach Expo

The Cardinal Type Collection of Early Copper, a multi-million dollar display of over two dozen high-grade early American copper pieces including items from an all-time finest PCGS Set Registry collection, will be exhibited at the Long Beach Coin, Stamp & Collectibles Expo, June 3 – 5, 2010. The show will be held in the Long Beach, California Convention Center, 100 S. Pine Ave.

1793 S-2 cent, PCGS MS65BN, Cardinal Collection:  This 1793 Chain "AMERICA" (Sheldon-2 variety) large cent, graded PCGS MS65BN, is one of the highlights of the Cardinal Collection of Early Copper that will be displayed at the Long Beach Expo, June 3 - 5, 2010. “This special exhibit is a superb collection of historic and rare private coinage from 1787 to 1792 and early items from the Philadelphia Mint from 1793 up to 1852. The collection was assembled by Martin Logies and will be exhibited courtesy of Bowers & Merena Auctions,” said Ronald J. Gillio, Expo General Chairman.

Highlights of the exhibit include the following coins that were part of the 2009 PCGS Best of Registry winner for Large Cents Basic Set:

1793 Chain AMERICA S-2 variety formerly in the Beckwith, Collins and Naftzger Collections and graded PCGS MS65BN;

1793 Wreath, Vine and Bars Edge formerly in the Naftzger Collection, PCGS MS69BN;

1794 Head of 1793 formerly in the Garrett Collection, PCGS MS64 BN;

and 1803 No Stems S-243, PCGS MS66RB, formerly in the Helfenstein and Naftzger Collections.

1794 Head of 1793 cent, PCGS MS64 BN, Cardinal Collection:  Formerly in the famous Garrett Collection, this 1794 "Head of 1793" variety large cent graded PCGS MS64BN is one of the highlights of the Cardinal Collection of Early Copper that will be displayed at the Long Beach Expo, June 3 - 5, 2010.During the three-day Long Beach Expo more than 1,000 dealers will be buying and selling rare coins, paper money, stamps, postcards, historic documents, antiques, estate jewelry and other collectibles. Some dealers will provide free, informal appraisals for visitors.

A free gold coin door prize will be awarded each day to a lucky, registered visitor, and a children’s treasure hunt will be held on Saturday, June 5. A half dozen educational programs and collectors’ clubs meetings will be conducted during the show and will be open to the public.

Heritage Auction Galleries of Dallas, Texas (www.HA.com), the world’s largest collectibles auction house and the official auctioneer of the Long Beach Expo, will hold a public auction of U.S. coins in conjunction with the show.

(more…)

The PCGS Las Vegas Invitational Coin Show

Market Report by Laura Sperber of Legend Numismatics

We were blown away at how many people attended. Dealer wise, the list was impressive. Collector wise, Thursday was a list or who’s who! In our opinion, it was the best attended show so far.

Dealer to dealer was not just strong, it was almost crazy. Our first sale was to the first dealer we saw and it was for $40,000.00! From there it was off to the races. Interestingly, Gold was red hot (especially generics) but soup to nuts coins were right up there too. Better gold did enjoy the strongest demand (things like MS65 $5 Indians, better date $10 Indians, and of course any rare date Saints). Selling was too dealer to dealer was almost too easy.

There were a few dealers who came in to “walk” the room. Our top stealth team seller was there and sold six figures just by walking around! Others were there trying to buy for Want Lists (we had two serious offers on our PCGS $2 1/2 Indian set) . And of course a dealer really wanted to buy our flipped over (sold back home) High Relief PCGS MS65 CAC. We actually stopped our wholesale activity early to keep some coins inventory for the upcoming Long Beach Show!

Selling to collectors at this mini show (there are only about 15 tables) was better than our last Long Beach and Baltimore Shows! The first collector who we saw sat down, looked at our PCGS PR66 CAC Barber Dime set and just wrote the check! After that we sold two two coins for over $10,000.00 each to other collectors.

THE MARKET

As you can expect, Gold has heated up and is back in demand. We did warn you! However, we are not certain this week gold won’t take a short breather. Even if it does not, apparently the telemarkters recieved massive orders and are back out searching for coins ranging from bullion to expensive rarities. We expect ALL rare gold to remain strong (even if spot gold comes down) becuase there is strong demand and practically no supply. It seems many people feel building a GEM Gold Type set is a very acceptable way to own gold and hedge on it (we do agree).

NOTE: When buying better gold-make sure it is CAC’d. It is not so much because of the grading, its because of so many coins being doctored in some way. Legend is an owner of CAC and sells ONLY CAC stickered coins. We made this decision based upon the serious number of bad gold pieces we have seen. Dreck like that you do not want to be stuck owning. We can tell you BOTH David Hall and Mark Salzberg are committed to the war against coin doctors as are the principals of CAC. We just wish more dealers would take a stand against these villians among us who are ruining coins.

We saw very few coins “made” at the show that were not of the generic gold nature. So the supplies of all metals of all rare coins is still slim to non existant! We still urge you to buy when a great coin does become available-even if there is a strong premium involved. There was some dreck in a few dealers boxes, but those dealers will always have more dreck than nice coins as they are price buyers/crackout dealers.

Ponterio Baltimore Auction to Offer Diverse Selection of Ancient and World Coins, Plus Currency

Ponterio & Associates, Inc., the world and ancients auction division of Bowers and Merena Auctions, will conduct its Baltimore Auction of World and Ancient Coins and Paper Money as part of Bowers and Merena’s Official Auction of the June 2010 Whitman Coin & Collectibles Baltimore Expo.

The two-session sale will be conducted June 18 and 19 at the Baltimore Convention Center. More than 2,300 lots will be offered, including approximately 1,500 lots of Ancient and foreign coins and 825 lots of world paper money.

Executive vice president, Rick Ponterio states, “Our June 2010 Baltimore Auction is sure to see strong bidder participation—and competition—among specialists in many areas of foreign coins and paper money. Featured among the coin offerings in this sale are important rarities from many periods of history, ranging from Ancient Greece to the modern era.”

Continued Ponterio: “An example of the diversity in this sale can be found in two of the more important highlights. The first is a very rare Zeugitana, Carthage AV Trihemistater, or 1 ½ Shekel, that dates to the early period of the First Punic War (ca. 264-260 BC). The coin is attributed alternatively as Jenkins & Lewis Group IX Pl.18#392 (same dies) and Muller-Pg.86#66, and has been certified by NGC as AU, Strike: 5/5, Surface: 3/5.”

“We will also present a Yuan Dynasty Zhi Yuan 50 Tael Sycee Ingot that is extremely rare and historically significant,” Ponterio added. “It is dated the 14th year of the Zhìyuán era (1273 A.D.), inscribed with the denomination at upper left and the ruler’s name and date at lower center, Khubilai Khan, the fifth Great Khan, grandson of Genghis Khan (1260-94). It is among the earliest known Chinese 50 Tael Sycee ingot.”

MORE THAN 825 LOTS OF WORLD PAPER MONEY TO BE OFFERED

“We have received a wide array of important world paper money consignments for this sale,” stated Bowers and Merena’s director of currency auctions, Matthew Quinn. “A splendid selection of Iranian notes from the 1920s and 1930s figure prominently among the highlights in this auction, and they include a stunning Choice Uncirculated 1 Toman note dated 1.6.1920 and attributed as P-1b. Also of note is a China, Republic, 5 Yuan dated 4.10.1914 and attributed as P-34. The note grades Very Fine and is significant because examples of this type are usually seen only in remainder form without signatures and perforated ‘canceled,’ which is a fate this note escaped. We anticipate strong bidder competition for these and other important world paper money lots in this sale.” (more…)

CSNS Coin Show Report

By Bill Shamhart – NumismaticAmericana.com

I just returned home after a short 1 1/2 flight from Milwaukee, and thought I’d write about the Central States Numismatic Society’s show that was just held. First off let me say that this year marks my 30th year as a Life Member of the CSNS. And I’ve attended at least that many shows of theirs. But this one was different.

I arrived on Tuesday to look at the inventory of some of my contacts, as I usually do. Not much to report there. I know it sounds like a broken record, but really nice coins aren’t available like one would think. Basically a wasted day. Centralstates2010Homepage On to Wednesday, PNG day. I was able to find a few morsels, but I sold at least two coins for every one that I bought. For the first time in a long time, every time I sold a coin I asked myself when (and how) was I going to replace it. Let’s give PNG day a B-. But it ended on a good note at a great restaurant: STANFORDS.

Thursday was the “official” set-up day for Central States. All dealers. All day. Unless of course the collectors wanted to pay a ridiculous fee of $75.00 for a “professional pre-view” badge. Which in my opinion was a bad move on the show management’s part. Serious collectors may have, or may not have, been at the PNG day and expected to attend the “show” the next day, only to find this arrangement. Every dealer we spoke with thought this was a horrible idea. I must say I agree with them. First off, no where was this publicized. Nobody knew of this move until they got to Milwaukee. Hopefully the board of Central States will learn a lesson from this blunder and NEVER do something like this again.

So…how was the show after the public got in? Good. No, really good. We saw many familiar faces, met some new ones, and sold coins. Gem type coins and Commemoratives (both silver and gold) were in demand. Several collectors looked at pieces, said they might come back (and they did) only to find their items of interest already in the hands of another. I have always said, and will continue to say, that the time to buy the “right” coin is when you see it. I’m not talking about an impulse buy, or maybe a coin you have a passing interest in, but that special one. The one that you’ve been looking for for a long time. I know that when I see a great coin, I know that I will be buying it. It is just a matter of negotiating price. Collectors should learn that trait. Good coins sell themselves, and quickly.

The membership of the Central States Numismatic Society is a diverse one. Coins, paper money, medals and tokens, and Americana. There were collectors at this show looking for it all. In addition to our rare coin sales, we sold quite a bit of Numismatic Americana. Original memorabilia for U.S. Commemorative coinage was in “big” demand. In fact, we sold all that we brought. Items from the 1896/1900 election between William McKinley and William Jennings Bryan were also sought out. It’s great to speak with collectors and hear the “passion” in their voice when they talk. It reminds me of why I do what I do. (more…)

Heritage CSNS Coin and Currency Auctions Tops $25 Million

Gold remains dominant in surging rare coin market; 1921 Saint-Gaudens, Ex: Norweb, leads all lots with $218,500

With the final tallies for Heritage’s April 28 to May 3 Milwaukee Central States Numismatic and Currency auctions in at more than $20 million jointly – $16.9 million in rare U.S. Coins and $3.1 million in rare currency – the totals of the two auctions, in combination with the previous week’s Chicago International Coin Fair World Coin auction – a $5.2 million event – made for a 10 day stretch that totaled more than $25 million in total for the company. All prices include Buyer’s Premium.

“We continue to see great prices across all categories, with gold simply dominating,” said Greg Rohan, President of Heritage. “The economy is definitely improved, so we saw less volume as collectors don’t absolutely need to sell. That said, however, the market continues to climb past the previous record 2007-2008 levels on many coins.”

The rare U.S. coins portion of CSNS saw a superb 89% of lots sold by value and 92% by total number of lots, contested by just more than 7,250 bidders, while the rare currency sessions saw a highly respectable 86% of lots sell by value and 94% by total lots, with 1,915 bidders vying for the offerings.

The top lot in CSNS was the Select 1921 Saint-Gaudens Double Eagle MS63 PCGS, Ex: Norweb, an historic absolute and condition rarity with few peers in the world of numismatics, which brought $218,500

“We continue to see great prices across all categories, with gold simply dominating,” said Greg Rohan, President of Heritage.

“Gold currently rules, and the king is Saint-Gaudens,” said Rohan, “and the 1921 Saint-Gaudens double eagle is a premier rarity in the series, ranking as the third rarest regular issue, behind only the famous and ultra-rare 1933 and 1927-D examples. The price that this very smart collector paid for this amazing and famous coin is money very well spent.” (more…)

Legend Market Report: The 2010 Central States Coin Show

We were VERY surprised at how the show ended up for us. But then our expectations were small. It took a tremendous effort to make things happen.

Arriving on Tuesday, we immediately did business within 5 minutes of arriving at the hotel. Since everyone was scattered around different hotels, activity was limited until set up began. At CSNS they have a PNG Day. So as usual us lesser folk had wait outside while the mighty members of PNG set up. Once allowed in, true to form for PNG days, activity was non existent. Many dealers got spooked fearing the entire show could be lame. We feel very strongly these PNG days add nothing to a show and actually hurt momentum.

Thursday was dealer set up day. Since there had been a full PNG Day and the night before PNG set up, the majority of dealers were ruffled by the fact the CSNS people did not allow any public in until Friday. If you wanted in Thursday, you had to pay $75.00. We heard one angry collector say he’d much rather go tip cows.

However, a funny thing happened during regular dealer set up: activity started to happen. We can’t say there was a rush, but we saw signs of coins selling. By the end of the day, we had done some significant sales and we spoke to others who had seen some life too. When the public was allowed in Friday-there was activity! We were totally surprised at how many collectors did show up Friday. In the morning there was a light buzz. Buying was not aggressive, but you could sell a coin here and there.

The biggest problem Legend had: BUYING. Yes, this is broken record: THERE ARE NO NICE, FRESH, COINS TO BUY! On Friday evening as the show closed, we tallied up our buying on the floor: $93,000.00-of which ONE coin was $50,000.00. Each day dealers would ask each other: did you buy anything? We know this lack of nice coins made many collectors leave the show earlier than they had anticipated.

One huge positive note: dreck was finally being bought! Since the floor was so dry, dealers realized they needed to make a living. So the intelligent soles who knew better lowered yet again the prices of their dreck and made the pieces more attractive. Two of our stealth sales team each sold an expensive coin (over $50,000.00) that we have had in our inventory for a year! We knew this would happen eventually. (more…)

Paper Money Guaranty to Grade and Encapsulate ANA Bebee Collection

Project Enables ANA to Showcase Collection at Boston Convention

The American Numismatic Association has contracted with its official paper money grader, Paper Money Guaranty, LLC to encapsulate, grade, appraise and provide a complete certification report for the ANA Bebee Collection of Paper Money.

The collection, donated to the ANA Edward C. Rochette Money Museum by Aubrey and Adeline Bebee in 1987, is one of most comprehensive collections of U.S. paper money ever assembled. It features 904 notes including national bank notes from virtually every state and territory and perhaps the finest collection of large-sized notes outside of the Smithsonian Institution.

“This agreement with PMG makes it possible for the ANA to share this fabulous collection with numismatists and paper money aficionados who, otherwise, might never have an opportunity to see the spectacular rarities collected by Aubrey and Adeline Bebee,” said ANA Executive Director Larry Shepherd. “The Bebees entrusted the ANA to protect and preserve their life’s work – but we also know that they hoped this special collection could be shared with the numismatic community. It’s a great feeling to know that we’ll now be able to expand our use of these notes for educational purposes, share them with the numismatic community, and preserve them for future generations.”

“This is such a special collection,” said Glen Jorde, manager of PMG, which along with NGC and NCS serve as the ANA’s official grading and conservation services. “So many of the Bebee specimens are either unique or the finest we’ve ever seen. The national bank note collection, with nearly every state and territory represented, blew me away. And the collection of large-sized U.S. notes is simply one of the finest anywhere outside of the Smithsonian.”

The Bebee collection, displayed on the ANA website , will be encapsulated in time for its inaugural display at the summer ANA World’s Fair of Money in Boston, August 10-14, at the Hynes Convention Center.

Beginning this month, PMG will accurately and safely grade and encapsulate each note into a holder designed for long-term protection. Three PMG graders will examine each of the notes to confirm authenticity, attribution and to render an opinion on its condition. Once graded, each note will be encapsulated along with a certification label. The information will then be recorded in PMG’s data management system and provided to the ANA. The project is scheduled for completion by June 11. (more…)

Heritage 2,700+ Lot Currency Signature Auction at Central States, April 28-May 3

The Official Currency Auction of the 2010 Central States Numismatic Society Convention in Milwaukee will be conducted by Heritage Auctions April 28 to May 3. The auction will include three floor sessions and an online session. Lot viewing will be conducted at the Midwest Airlines Center, Rooms 201 A thru D, 400 West Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53203 and the floor sessions will be held in Rooms 203 A and B.

Session One starts Wednesday evening, April 28, at 6 p.m. CT, and includes Colonials, Fractional Currency, Obsoletes, Confederate Notes, and Canadian Currency. Featured lots include: Fr. 1330 50¢ Third Issue Spinner PMG Gem Uncirculated 66 EPQ; a rare Kirtland, OH- The Kirtland Safety Society Bank $50 Mar. 9, 1837 G16 Wolka 1424-16 Rust SV6; New Orleans, LA- Citizens’ Bank of Louisiana $10 Uncut Sheet of “Dixie” Notes PMG Choice Uncirculated 63; T2 $500 1861 PF-1 PMG Choice Very Fine 35; and a unique Windsor, NS- Commercial Bank of Windsor $20-$20-$20-$20 Ch. 195-10-02S Uncut Specimen Sheet PMG About Uncirculated 50.

National Bank Notes will be sold during Session Two
, on Thursday, April 29 at 6 p.m. CT. The auction includes Part II of selections from the Lone Star Collection, an assemblage of National Bank Notes formed over three decades consisting of the very finest notes that could be obtained from Arkansas, Oklahoma and Texas. The consignor’s Arkansas collection is almost certainly the finest ever formed, with his Oklahoma holdings ranking as one of the two greatest collections ever formed on that state, and the Texas collection rivals any ever assembled save for that of William Philpott.

Among the notes from the collection being offered are a unique Serial Number One $50 Date Back from Oklahoma Madill, OK – $50 1882 Date Back Fr. 564 The First NB Ch. # (W)5404 PMG Very Fine 20 and Marietta, IT – $10 1882 Brown Back Fr. 490 The Marietta NB Ch. # (W)5958 PMG About Uncirculated 55.

Additional National Bank Note highlights from Session Two include: Oakland, CA – $10 1875 Fr. 419 The Union National Gold Bank Ch. # 2266 PCGS Very Fine 35PPQ; Serial Number One Lead, SD – $5 1882 Brown Back Fr. 472 The First NB Ch. # 4631 PMG Very Fine 30; and Serial Number One Lake Ronkonkoma, NY – $20 1929 Ty. 1 The NB of Lake Ronkonkoma Ch. # 13130 PMG About Uncirculated 55 EPQ.

The floor sessions of the auction will conclude with the Friday evening Session Three
offering of Small Size Currency, Error Notes, and Large Size Type Notes. The session will begin at 6:00 p.m. CT. Small Size selections include: Fr. 2221-H $5000 1934 Federal Reserve Note PMG Choice Extremely Fine 45 Net; Fr. 2231-J $10000 1934 Federal Reserve Note PMG Extremely Fine 40 Net; and Fr. 2407 $500 1928 Gold Certificate PMG Choice Very Fine 35. (more…)

ANA Board Names Chicago as the site of the summer ANA World’s Fair of Money® in 2013, 2014 and 2015

Board Also Approves Fall Show and Spring 2012 Location

The American Numismatic Association Board of Governors, on March 27, approved a recommendation from Executive Director Larry Shepherd to name Chicago as the site of the summer ANA World’s Fair of Money® in 2013, 2014 and 2015, and to launch a fall show in 2011.

A third annual ANA convention will be scheduled between late September and mid-October, and will rotate among major cities like Pittsburgh, Boston and Denver. The ANA will continue to hold annual spring and summer shows.

The Board named Denver as the site of the 2012 spring ANA National Money Show™, scheduled for May to avoid Colorado’s unpredictable early spring weather.

“Successful conventions and auction contracts are critical to our future,” ANA Executive Director Larry Shepherd said. “We can now move immediately to ‘brand’ Chicago as an ANA city.”

Shepherd stressed the importance of branding Chicago as the home of the summer ANA World’s Fair of Money, noting the success FUN has had branding Orlando as its home, and Whitman establishing Baltimore as a show destination.

“By selecting a single good location, the ANA will brand its summer convention as an annual ‘coin show destination’ that all collectors and dealers will strive to attend. The dates will be tightly fixed, the location well known and easily accessible at a reasonable cost. But most importantly, it will give us an opportunity to expand our show and set it apart from all others.”

Shepherd said the convention hall space available at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center (formerly the Rosemont Convention Center) in Chicago allows the ANA to increase bourse space, create more room for museum-quality exhibits, provide free space for clubs and professional organizations to meet, and provide more table options to attract new dealers and first-time buyer tables. (more…)

Industry Leaders Comment on New PCGS Secure + Coin Grading Announcement

David Lisot, Executive Producer of Coin Television has put together a montage of comments from industry leaders following the PCGS announcement of its New Secure + coin grading service

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The PCGS Secure Plus process uses laser scanning to help detect coins that have been artificially enhanced since their last certification, combat “gradeflation” and excessive resubmissions of the same coins, and can also be used to help identify recovered stolen coins. Additionally, PCGS graders can now designate deserving, superior-quality coins as “Plus” within their respective grades, an important distinction when there are big differences in value between one grade point and the next.


The following industry professionals are included in this video as follows:

Video used with permission and courtesy of CoinTelevision.com and CoinVideo.com.

Adam Crum and the Ship of Gold Exhibit from the Long Beach Coin Expo – Video News

A decade after its first appearance, the precedent-setting “Ship of Gold” display showcasing California Gold Rush-era sunken treasure recovered from the 1857 shipwreck of the SS Central America was again docked in Long Beach, California.

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The $10 million exhibit was publicly displayed during the Long Beach Coin, Stamp & Collectibles Expo in February, marking its 10th anniversary.

“The ‘Ship of Gold’ exhibit is out of dry dock” said Ronald J. Gillio, Expo General Chairman. “The eye-opening display on the convention center floor is housed in a specially-constructed 40-foot long representation of the famous ship’s hull. This will be the first public appearance of the ‘Ship of Gold’ exhibit anywhere in the country in six years.”

The exhibit is courtesy of Monaco Rare Coins of Newport Beach and involved months of work to coordinate the display with collectors who privately own and now have generously loaned many of the items for the exhibit, according to Adam Crum, Monaco Vice President.
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