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All Posts Tagged With: "Dan Holmes"

Coin Rarities & Related Topics: Southern California Auctions and Market Realities

News and Analysis regarding scarce coins, coin markets, and the coin collecting community #4

A Weekly Column by Greg Reynolds

I. Today’s Theme

While both the Goldbergs and Heritage auctions contained a significant number of appealing coins that attracted collectors, both firms had much more exciting offerings in their respective Southern California auctions in the Springs of 2007, 2008 and 2009. Moreover, as John Albanese has emphasized, much of the demand in current coin markets is for Eagles ($10 coins) and Double Eagles ($20 gold coins).

Albanese is the founder of the CAC, and was the sole founder of the NGC. He finds that, this year, there has been “less demand for silver coins dating after 1837.” From my (this writer’s) perspective, demand for rare silver coins has fallen since the January 2010 FUN Convention, though will probably rise again soon.

There will be more exciting offerings of rare silver coins, in Boston in August, than there have been from February to June. Exciting offerings may spark collectors. Plus, relative prices for Eagles and Double Eagles will not increase, forever. Collectors will tend to gravitate towards other areas.

For decades, Jim McGuigan has been a specialist in U.S. coins dating from 1793 to the late 1830s. Jim finds that “things really slowed down after Sept. 2008.” This year, McGuigan says, there has “not been a lot of good pre-1840 stuff coming up at auction; when a good coin does come up, it usually does pretty well. 1793 half cents and large cents are as strong as ever. 1794 to 1796 [dated] coins are still pretty good” in terms of demand, McGuigan observes. The market for early coins that are not very rare is weak. “Randall Hoard large cents,” for example, “are easy to buy,” Jim points out. These are high grade, often appealing uncirculated, large cents, dating mostly from 1818 to 1820.

Demand is not great for Liberty Seated coins and Barber coins, I conclude. Matt Kleinsteuber, of NFCcoins, asserts that “this [Spring] was not a good time to auction” a collection of “gem Buffalo Nickels.” Matt twice put forth a similar point to me before the Heritage Long Beach auction.

Trading volume in common gold coins continues to be large. High End gold rarities, which are not necessarily expensive, are extremely difficult to find. (Please refer to my article on the Widening Gap for a definition of ‘high end.’)

Below, I discuss an 1854-O Double Eagle that sold at the Long Beach (CA) Expo. I devote considerable space to Dan Holmes’ Middle Dates as numerous collectors have expressed interest in reading about this event. Even collectors who do not collect large cents like to read about a comprehensive and famous collection that was built over many years by a dedicated coin enthusiast.

I talk about coins in the Goldbergs and Heritage Southern California auctions that I find to be newsworthy. Sometimes, coins are mentioned as examples to illustrate larger points. It is never possible for me to discuss all the very interesting or otherwise newsworthy coins in a major auction. (more…)

The Perfect Auctions-The Holmes And Nafzger Large Cent Sales

By Laura Sperber – Legend Numismatics

“The perfect auctions” we are talking about are the Dan Holmes and Ted Nazfger Large Cent auctions that just took place in Beverly Hills. Ira and Larry Goldberg (and staffs) did a spectacular job of organizing and auctioning these once in a life time sales.

ln_market_090909The results from these two sales let no one down-they were phenomenal and totally mind blowing! Prices realized and collector participation more than proved the coin market is starved for quality and has very strong and deep legs.

Last time we wrote about the middle date Nafzger Sale, we named it “the perfect storm”. We knew the coin that auction had sold ridiculously cheap and time would prove it out. The reasons why that sale had weaker results: the sale was held the same day (during) the Super bowl, the Goldberg’s Internet site crashed, the economy was seriously more uncertain than it is today, and a few new collectors to the series had just started. Its totally amazing how all these factors did a total reversal to yield some of the most amazing results ever and produce two greatly historical auctions.

THE DAN HOLMES SALE

The crowd was standing room only and was comprised mostly of serious collectors. There wasn’t just a buzz before the sale began, you could feel and jolt of electricity when you walked in the room. From our point of view we did not see the typical “crack out and coin docs” we run into at every show. Thank goodness they do not know how to work on anything than other than a white dollar or a gold coin. In fact, very few “main line” dealers like us attended.

It was a battle every lot to buy anything. The room was littered with deep pocketed individuals who came to buy. In the end, we witnessed at least FOUR collectors who spent OVER $1,000,000.00 each and several under bidders who had tried to do the same. Legend spent a lowly $300,000.00 for ourselves, and teamed up with a another dealer to buy another $600,000.00 worth of treasures. There were many “unknown” faces who came out of hiding for this sale and they were as aggressive as someone you’d see who attends every show and auction. (more…)