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All Posts Tagged With: "english coins"

Spink World Coin Auction Realises over £3.2 Million

Over the past 48 hours, Spink auctioned their highest grossing coin sale to date. The fantastic catalogue of over 1300 coins totalled over £3.2 million in sales and generated interest from collectors around the world. Dozens of phone bidders, a standing only room and hundreds of participants on Spink Live contributed to a bidding frenzy in the room.

William Mackay, specialist at Spink, had this to say about the sale:

“This sale demonstrates the strong market for top quality, rare historical gold coins. It definitely showcases the extent to which the value of these sorts of coins have appreciated in the last few years. We are extremely pleased with the results of this sale which demonstrates continued confidence in the marketplace.”

Top lots included the following:

Lot 895
Henry VII (1485-1509), Sovereign, type IV
Sold for £180,000

Lot 949
Charles I, Civil War issues, Oxford,
small module type Triple Unite
Sold for £161,000

Lot 5
Mughal Empire, Jalal ud-Din Muhammad Akbar,
AV 5-Mohurs
Sold for £150,000

Lot 948
Charles I, Civil War issues, Oxford, Triple Unite
Sold for £120,000

Lot 975
James VI (1567-1625), second coinage,
Twenty-Pound piece
Sold for £102,000

About Spink

Spink is the world’s leading auctioneer of coins, stamps, medals, banknotes, bonds, share certificates and autographs, with offices in London, Singapore, New York and Dallas. Since its foundation in 1666, the Spink name has become synonymous with tradition, experience and integrity. Holders of three royal warrants and numerous records for prices achieved at auction, Spink offer an unparalleled range of services to collectors worldwide.

For more information, pictures or to request an interview with the specialist please contact Emily Johnston, ejohnston@spink.com , 020 7563 4009.

First Gold Coin Struck in the Name of an English King to be Sold by Spink

[CoinLink News] The UK auction firm of Spink has announced the upcoming sale of an Anglo-Saxon gold Shilling of King Eadbald of Kent dating from c.620-635. This is the first gold coin struck in the name of an English King and a rare and important piece of English history. Found near Deal Kent in 2010, this coin will be sold at auction on June 24th and is expected to fetch upwards of £8,000. (Editor: Seems very Inexpensive)

This type was long known to be amongst the earliest of Anglo-Saxon gold coins with a single example present in the important Crondall hoard found in Hampshire in 1828 and dating from c.670. The conclusive attribution of these coins to king Eadbald of Kent, reigned 616-640, though was only made in 1998. This followed the emergence of new finds which enabled the obverse inscription to be confirmed as avdvarld reges, and translated as ‘of King Audvarld’.

The name ‘auduarldus’ appears in Bede’s Historia Ecclesiastica completed in 731 in which he wrote about king Eadbald of Kent. Given this and the presence of one of these coins in the Crondall hoard, the attribution to Eadbald is now accepted

While the Kentish Shilling or Thrymsa seems to have sought to match the Merovingian Tremissis, the design of this coin is peculiarly Anglo-Saxon using neither motifs found on Merovingian coins nor seeking to copy Roman types. In common with some other coins (e.g. the so called ‘Witmen’ and ‘Londiniv/Londeniv’ types), this coin has an inscription on the reverse. This can be clearly read on a example in the Ashmolean Museum as containing the word londenv indicating London as the mint or die source for these coins all of which share the same obverse die.

The real significance of these coins though is in the obverse inscription naming the historical figure of king Eadbald. This is exceptional for a coin of this period and is only certainly found again at the end of the seventh century with the Sceattas of Aldfrith of Northumbria (685-705). As such the Eadbald Thrymsa is the earliest coin issued in the name of an English king.

Eadbald succeded Aethelberht as king of Kent in 616. Aethelberht is principally remembered for having accepted St. Augustine into his kingdom and his subsequent conversion to Roman Christianity. It seems, according to Bede, that after his accession Eadbald fell foul of the young Church, rejecting Christianity, ejecting its Bishops and incurring the wrath of the Church committing ‘such fornication as the Apostle Paul mentioned as being unheard of even among the heathen, in that he took his father’s (second) wife as his own.’

Whatever Eadbald did, this situation did not last for he repented and was duly baptized, rejecting his wife and thereafter favouring the Church within his kingdom. (more…)

Goldbergs Acquire Legendary King Edward VIII 1937 Proof Set

At the end of February 2010, Ira and Larry Goldberg Coins & Collectibles purchased England’s legendary King Edward VIII 1937 Proof Set for $2.1 Million (1,350,000 Pounds). This purchase was made in England with the assistance of noted English coin dealers Steve Fenton and Mark Rasmussen.

Considered the “Holy Grail” of English Milled Coinage, this is the only Proof Set of its kind in private hands, and all are in Gem Proof condition. This set has never before been seen outside of England.

Apparently, only four sets, plus a few minors, were minted; the Royal Mint has two of the sets, and another was broken up over 40 years ago, with a few of the coins occasionally appearing at auction.

King Edward the VIII abdicated the throne in December of 1936, after reigning for only 10 months, to marry the American divorcee Mrs. Willis Simpson, a commoner.

It is this King Edward VIIII quote that many school children have been taught to memorize: “I have found it impossible to carry the heavy burden of responsibility and to discharge my duties as King as I would wish to do without the help and support of the woman I love.”

The proof set was minted at the Royal Mint and dated 1937 to be issued on his coronation in January 1937, an event which never took place.

This particular set belonged to Mrs. R. Henry Norweb, whose husband was the American Ambassador to England.

2010 British Coin Forecast

By Geoffrey Cope – CoinLink Content Partner – www.petitioncrown.com

Based on information from dealers and following market conditions I would forecast that the prices over the next years will keep an upward movement.

spinks_coins_of_england_2010The above is supported by the increase of individuals and pension for diversification of assets and protection.

The Fenton Auction in London saw a jump in prices for high quality pieces; this will be followed by the market increasing for lesser quality items. The Internet is producing a new base of collectors who consider today’s price levels inexpensive. The UK has an old company that is introducing Numismatics as an Alternative Asset for inflation protection. The difference is today the companies would prefer and orderly market, prices not to run out of hand.

If you analyze historically from 1936 to date on the material through auctions and major dealers except for re-adjustment of prices of items that were miss-priced the compound growth for coins is +11.0% -12.5%. Average inflation during this period was 3.8%. This can vary if specific areas of British coins are not popular for a period.

Price comparisons between USA and UK coins, the gap is so great I can hope the US collector does not decide to collect UK material in a serious way – otherwise we will see price rises we have never seen in the UK market as it will be re-structured the US way which is different than the UK.[A comparison of values will increase many items several times] An example in one change will be that in the US the dealers will stock and support the market and hold much more stock at higher prices. (more…)