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All Posts Tagged With: "Generic Gold coins"

Another Gold Record Set; But Generic Gold Coins Still Lag

By Steve Roach – First published in the October 4, 2010, issue of Coin World

With all this interest in gold and the mainstream attention it is getting, one would think that generic gold coins would be blazing hot. Yet, many of the most popular issues trade at heavy discounts to earlier in the year when gold was trading at the $1,100 an ounce level.

The coins that investors typically flock to during bullion run-ups, Saint Gaudens $20 double eagles and Coronet double eagles, are trading at substantial discounts to what they were trading for at the start of the year.

For example, one major wholesale market maker at the close of 2009 was selling certified Saint Gaudens double eagles for $1,660 in Mint State 62, $1,820 in MS-63, $2,070 in MS-64 and $2,580 in MS-65. Today, that same dealer is selling the coins at $1,550, $1,590, $1,660 and $2,080 in the same grades respectively.

Other gold series are experiencing declines at the wholesale generic level, as market makers are not taking large positions in these coins, but $10 eagles and double eagles have suffered the worst declines.

Earlier this year one dealer was selling Indian Head eagles in MS-64 for $2,470; today the same dealer is selling them at $1,580.

In general, the only generic gold coins that have gained value this year are circulated coins, which are dependent on bullion prices for value.

In light of rapidly increasing gold values, one wonders how much longer these discounts will persist.

The recent announcement that the Mint intends to release Proof 2010-W American Eagle gold coins has put a further chill on the market for earlier Proof American Eagle gold coins.

In the Aug. 30 Market Analysis, I reported that major market-maker buy prices for the earlier coins with original Mint packaging had fallen to $1,750 an ounce, down from $2,000 an ounce.

As of Sept. 16, many of the market-makers have dropped out of the market and the few who remain are buying the earlier coins for as low as $1,575 an ounce, with the highest price being a small order at $1,600 an ounce.

Visit Steve’s Rare Coin Market Report Blog at http://coinmarketreport.blogspot.com/

As the 2009 Coin Market Comes to a Close, Where Are We and Where Are We Headed?

By Doug Winter – Raregoldcoins.com

With the year nearly over, we are heading towards a slow few weeks in the coin business followed by what is certain to be an interesting FUN Show in January 2010. As we close the year out, I thought it would be interesting to look at a few points and ask where we are and where we’re headed.

dw_may09_5wvalueI have been through some odd coin markets (1982-84 and 1992-1994 come to mind) but what we are currently experiencing is pretty much unique. We are seeing a market where coins that were considered unfavorable a few months ago (bullion and semi-numismatic) are now what everyone wants and “real” coins are as hard to find as at any time I can remember.

The demand for generic U.S. gold, especially double eagles, remains as strong as I have ever seen. The premiums are as high as I can remember. As I write this, gold spot is at $1,140 per ounce (after having broken the seemingly unreachable $1,200 barrier last week) and an average quality MS60 to MS62 Saint is trading for $1,600-1,700. This 40%+ premium over melt for a low-end Saint is easily the highest I can recall and I think it’s pretty remarkable considering that you had to beg people to buy the exact sort of coins a few months ago at a 10% premium.

I am beginning to see some profit taking in the generic market and I think this will continue for a short period, possibly evaporating the premiums. That said, with the current sad state of the American dollar and the worldwide demand for gold, I wouldn’t be stunned to see gold break $1,500 in the next few months and a lower quality Saint to be worth close to $2,000 (!)

What about the rare coin market? It is, in its own way, experiencing topsy-turvy conditions not dissimilar to generics. The big difference is that there is good supply in the generic market but very limited supply in the rare coin market. (more…)