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All Posts Tagged With: "toned coins"

Legend Purchases The Brian Sonnier Morgan Dollar Collection

Legend Numismatics is proud to announce the outright purchase of the Brian Sonnier Collection of colored dollars and CC GSA coins.

Brian is a long time collector (known to many as GSAGUY). You may have seen him set up at shows back in the early to mid 90’s to just display his coins.

He started his work on this incredible collection over 20 years ago. It did not matter whether it was a colored Morgan or a 91CC GSA, he had to have the best and wildest looking. The results are mind-boggling.

This collection blows away ALL other colored dollar sets that we have ever seen (yes, this collection in some ways is wilder than Sunnywood). There is every type of ORIGINAL coloration pattern. The colors mimic the wildest brightest rainbows-and yes, there are tons of reds and greens.

This was not a collection assembled overnight. Major collections were cherry picked, every auction was checked out, and he had several dealers always “on the hunt” so he could get the best of the best colored coins.

Unlike recent major colored collections to have hit the market, these coins are NOT near color misses or watered down grade wise. They also are not over graded as 95% of the collection was raw! And we did pay well in excess of $10,000.00 for more than one 80S-82S $1!!!!!!!!!

A small portion of his CC GSA collection was purchased in partnership with long time CC dealer Doug Sharpe (Aspen Rare Coins) of Sarasota Florida.

Doug as well has known Brian for many years. Since GSA’s were not our strong point, we knew Doug was the right dealer to assist us. As for the remainder of the CC’s, Brian loves them too much wanted to happily keep that part of his collection (believe us, we tried hard to buy them).

We thank Brian for keeping his promise to us over the years. Sitting at his dinning room table, the negotiations took minutes. It was tough for him to sell, but he knows the coins are going to be placed in the best homes. We have not stopped drooling and looking at the coins! Every single coin is a memorable MONSTER!

Additional Images and availability can be found on the Legend Numismatics Website

Legend Numismatics Sells The Sunnywood Toned Morgan Dollar Coin Collection

Legend Numismatics, a coin dealer specializing in high-quality, rare U.S. coinage, announced the sale of the entire Sunnywood “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” Toned Morgan Dollar Collection to a private collector who wishes to remain anonymous. Financial details were not released, but Legend spokesperson Laura Sperber acknowledged that it was a “multi-million dollar transaction” and that the collection was sold intact.

DouglasKurz_120909The Sunnywood Collection (Circulation Strikes from 1878-1921 including three important varieties) was painstakingly assembled over a period of several years by Douglas Kurz, a long-time collector who is a successful businessman and former concert pianist. Bucking the market trend of preference for “white” Morgan Dollars, he decided to put together a complete set of Morgans with “attractive, original color, at least on the obverse.”

Prominently featured in the PCGS Set RegistrySM (www.PCGS.com/SetRegistry), the Sunnywood Collection, consisting exclusively of PCGS-graded coins, gained additional notoriety at the January 2009 FUN Show, the February and May 2009 Long Beach Expos, and in advertisements in Coin World and other numismatic publications.

One interesting point is that the most attractive pieces in terms of color and eye appeal are not necessarily the highest-graded pieces. Sunnywood strikes a balance between color and technical grade, so Set Registry ranking has sometimes been sacrificed for the sake of overall eye appeal.

Many collectors consider the Sunnywood Collection to be the finest set of toned Morgans ever assembled.

The collection includes many early common dates (between 1878 and 1888) and some later dates (such as 1896, 1899-O and 1904-O) that can be found with dramatic and vibrant multi-colored mint-bag toning. There are many dates, however, that simply do not exist with colorful toning. Those dates were sought instead with attractive original patination (the 1900-S and 1901-S are good examples).

Laura Sperber Comments:

In my mind, this is one collection that should not even exist. When Doug originally approached me about building the set with him, I did not think an all-colored Morgan set that nice was even possible to build. Point blank, I told him not to do it.

As time went on, I watched Doug work on the project. He was gracious enough to let Legend help him add a coin or two to this magnificent set. (more…)

The Basis for Collecting and Appreciating Naturally Toned Coins, Part 3

By Greg Reynolds for CoinLink

In Part 1, I frame the topic and put forth perspectives of very accomplished, active collectors regarding natural toning. As I discuss in Part 2, preferring coins with natural toning is a tradition at the core of the culture of coin collecting in the U.S.

Here in Part 3, I maintain that the case for strongly favoring naturally toned coins goes beyond collector opinions and tradition. There have always been logical reasons for determining that coins with natural toning and/or mostly original surfaces are superior.

nat_toned_120609(1) Coin collecting has been a popular and serious pastime for around 150 years in the United States, and there has always been a strong tradition of valuing, all other things being equal, coins with mostly original surfaces and/or natural toning over those that have been treated with acids (including dipping), artificially toned, surgically altered or deliberately chemically affected in other ways.

It is fair to conclude that experts in earlier eras were employing reason, not just following a tradition, especially before the tradition evolved. (Please read Part 2.)

(2) The layers of a coin’s surface that are stripped off, and the changes in the texture of the surfaces of coins, through standard dipping or the application of many chemical concoctions implemented via ‘conservation,’ or other deliberate, short-term modifications are, to some extent, irreparable. The original state of the coin can never be restored, and will never fully return on its own. Parts of the coin are destroyed, and, while some coins can largely recover, parts of the nature and history of each coin are lost forever.

Please note that I am referring primarily to rare or at least scarce old coins. Usually, recently minted coins are minimally or not noticeably toned. So, not much toning is destroyed when a recently minted, or modern coin, is dipped in a standard acidic solution. For high quality, rare coins, dipping or ‘conservation’ through liquids, almost always destroys toning.

Typically, a coin will be much brighter after it is dipped, and some will thus conclude that the coin’s luster is not impaired. Luster is the way that the metal flow lines on a coin reflect light. When layers are stripped via dipping, the characteristics of the flow lines are changed. The coin may end up being brighter than it was before, or even brighter than it was the moment it was minted. Destruction still occurred, however, and metal was removed.

Jeff Ambio very much agrees with the above statement (#2), and he “believe[s] that, if more collectors understood this point, it would really help to the put the coin doctors out of business.” Ambio is the author of three recent books on coins and is a cataloguer for leading auction firms and coin dealers. He has analyzed and written about thousands of U.S. coins, including innumerable rarities.

Dipping changes the texture of a coin. Ambio, Joe O’Connor and myself all agree that toning that occurs after dipping, natural or not, will be different from the toning that would have occurred had the coin never been dipped. (more…)